Children’s Books: Ladybird Read it Yourself – Angry Birds

Angry Birds took the world by storm with a simple app that captivated young and old alike. Who would have thought they would go from a simple app to “Read it yourself” books by Ladybird?

 

About Ladybird Books

Ladybird books are known and loved the world over. For millions of people, they bring back the golden days of childhood – learning to read, discovering the magic of books, and growing up.

For over thirty-five years, the best-selling Read it yourself with Ladybird has helped children learn to read. With stories that feature essential key words, the Read it yourself books give children repeated practice for recognising and reading story-specific words. Read it yourself books are designed to be read independently at home or used in a guided reading session at school.

Currently, there are only four books in the series graded at Level 3 and Level 4 on Ladybird’s Read it yourself reading scale:

 

Ladybird Reading Level Guide

  • Level 3 title is suitable for children who are developing reading confidence and are eager to start reading longer stories with a wider vocabulary.
  • Level 4 title is ideal for children who are ready to read longer stories with a wider vocabulary and are keen to start reading independently.

Given the intense fascination that many children have with Angry Birds, these books are actually a terrific idea. If you have a reluctant reader who happens to love Angry Birds, this can be a great way to introduce your child to the literary world. Granted these books are a far cry from the children’s literary classics, but I have become a fast believer of Neil Gaiman’s reading philosophy – which is, in short, that any book or books that encourage a child to read are good books.

Well-meaning adults can easily destroy a child’s love of reading: stop them reading what they enjoy, or give them worthy-but-dull books that you like, the 21st-century equivalents of Victorian “improving” literature. You’ll wind up with a generation convinced that reading is uncool and worse, unpleasant.

We need our children to get onto the reading ladder: anything that they enjoy reading will move them up, rung by rung, into literacy. – Neil Gaiman

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